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The End

In the D&D campaign I am currently running, one player has to quit. He will play one more session with us, but that will be his last one. The campaign will continue without him, though. So I should find some in-game reason why his character won’t continue adventuring with the group.

There are several possibilities to do that, but this player had one wish: He wants his character to die a memorable death. So now I’m wondering how I can fulfill this wish.

I could simply make the last fight of the session extremely hard and let the monsters focus on the character of the quitting player. The good thing about this strategy is that it’s quite flexible. It is quite easy to tell, if a fight is going to be the last fight of the session – just look at your watch. So with this strategy, the character will not die early. But I think I won’t use this, because last session, I already overwhelmed my players with nearly unscalable encounters.

Or I have someone assassinate the character. In general, this is not a bad idea, as it automatically provides a plot hook – the players might want to find out who wanted their comrade dead. But this assassination should not come like a bolt from the blue. Otherwise this is too much a deus ex machina.

I think, I will choose the following way: The others characters have to flee from the fight, leaving their friend behind. Why should they do this? Maybe they have to rescue someone or have to retrieve something and get the person or the item away from the monster as fast as possible. The fleeing characters should see how their friend fights to hold back the monster, and finally dies, so they will always remember him and his sacrifice for their quest.

What do you think? How would you handle such a situation?

Foto by Ran Yaniv Hartstein under a Creative Commons license

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